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May 23. 2017

Introducing the NEW Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System!


This is the first in a series of blogs on teaching phonics with Fountas & Pinnell. Check back next week when we take a deeper dive into how phonics instruction works in other Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Resources

Say hello to organized, systematic instruction with the new Fountas & Pinnell Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System! In August of 2017, Fountas and Pinnell will release an updated, enhanced version of their 2003 resource, Phonics Lessons. See details below to get a closer look. More...
May 23. 2017

6 Ways to Help Children Learn Reading through Name Charts: A Teacher Tip from Fountas & Pinnell

A name is very powerful. It is often the first example of a written word a child sees. Name charts can help children learn their own names and the letters in the names of their friends, notice that names begin with an uppercase letter, and make connections to other words that have the same first letter or similar word parts.

Here are 6 ideas for quick games you can play using a name chart:

  1. Read the names in a shared way as you use a pointer to point to each (in order or randomly).
  2. Have children line up, quickly touch their own names when they come to the chart, and then sit down.
  3. “I’m thinking of someone who has a name that begins with M. Who can come up and find it?”
  4. Deal out cards or slips of paper on which children’s names are written. Call the names in alphabetical order. The child who has the name you called puts it in a pocket chart.
  5. Place a set of name cards at the word study center. Have the children sort the names by first letter or match pairs of name cards.
  6. Clap each name and have children tell the number of syllables they hear.

From When Readers Struggle: Teaching That Works by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2009 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

May 19. 2017

Daily Lit Bit - 5/19/17

All students need consistent and clear messages across instructional contexts. Our belief is that the curriculum must have a coherent design and a coherent underlying literacy theory rather than simply being a mix of “this and that,” without an eye to how different parts work together to form a cohesive whole.

May 18. 2017

Daily Lit Bit - 5/18/17

Each time you prompt in a guided reading lesson, it is a call to action. It evokes something the reader can do. You need to teach for the strategic action before you can call for the reader to engage it. When you see the reader is engaging in the behaviors independently, you move beyond prompting to reinforce it.

May 17. 2017

This Is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

Over the past few months, we have slowly pulled back the curtain on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™--a first-of-its-kind system for high-quality, classroom-based literacy instruction. There have been blog posts, webinars, and Twitter chats covering every angle of this exciting new system. In case you missed anything, below is a recap. More...