search navigation
September 1. 2017

Twitter Chat RECAP: The Power and Purpose of Assessment

On Thursday, August 31, Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell  hosted a Twitter Chat about The Power and Purpose of Assessment. People from all over the country logged in to share their thoughts about this important topic, just in time for the new school year! Followers engaged in a discussion about many different angles of assessment from how assessment informs moment-to-moment teaching decisions, to the importance of the continuous use of reading records in everyday instruction. Some favorite tweets included: 
Assessment is not teaching. It is gathering information for teaching. 
The decisions you make based on the data you collect will be the heartbeat of your responsive teaching.
Without effective assessment, instruction will be mere guesswork.

Save the date for our next Twitter Chat on September 28 at 8:00 p.m. EST when we will discuss Building Your Classroom Community.

August 29. 2017

4 Steps to Cope with Testing Demands

Students in school are tested continually, and their success is most often measured by their performance on paper-and-pencil tests. The stakes are also high for teachers because their performance is judged by how many students meet the criteria for success. The demand for accountability is intense and has the potential to reduce the language and literacy continuum to a very narrow set of exercises. If we care about our students, we need to make sure test taking has positive outcomes.

While we cannot ignore tests, we cannot let them control our lives and the lives of our students. We need to find ways to cope with the demands of the testing environment and still help our students have happy, productive, and satisfying literacy experiences. To cope with testing demands:

  1. Analyze the genuine underlying skills that students need in order to be able to perform well on comprehensive proficiency tests.
  2. Create an ongoing curriculum to help students develop the genuine reading and writing abilities that will provide a foundation for good test performance (as well as all the benefits of a literate life).
  3. Analyze the ways of reading, writing, and displaying knowledge that tests require.
  4. Familiarize students with the ways to display knowledge and skills that will be expected of them in test performance.

Without the first two steps, the others are ineffective. Being a competent reader and writer is basic to performing well on tests.

From Guiding Readers & Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2001 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

August 23. 2017

Ask Meli! August, 2017

Ask Meli is back!! Meli has received SO many wonderful questions and loves reading them all! It’s her favorite thing to do besides playing with her rubber chicken. She is so eager to answer them, so keep them coming!

Below are questions sent in from Gwen, Mila, Keandra, and Jaykub from Graham Elementary in Graham, WA.

Q: Dear Meli, I am a student in Graham, Washington. I know you like to go to the park. I like to go to the park too. Do you like to play in the backyard? ~Gwen

: Thank you for your letter. It was interesting to hear that you like to play in the park just like me! I like to run around in my backyard, too. Do you? Woof! Meli More...