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November 17. 2017

FAQ Friday: Is There a Scope and Sequence for Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

Q: Is there a scope and sequence for Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

A: Fountas & Pinnell Classroom is not a sequentially sequenced skills-based program, so there is no official scope and sequence. The Literacy Continuum serves as the curriculum underlying Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. It creates coherence across classrooms and grade levels within your school. You will immediately notice, however, that The Literacy Continuum is not prescriptive. It doesn’t dictate a static scope and sequence of lessons. Rather, The Literacy Continuum is descriptive: it describes, with precision, the characteristics of texts and the observable behaviors and understandings of proficient readers, writers, and language users that you may choose to notice, teach, and support.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

November 16. 2017

TWITTER CHAT RECAP, 11/16: A Level is a Teacher's Tool, NOT a Child's Label

On Thursday, November 16th, Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell hosted a Twitter Chat on how A Level is a Teacher's Tool, NOT a Child's Label. People from all over the country to join the conversation, sharing their own views, concerns, and queries about this very important subject. Some favorite tweets included: 

Levels can be a resource for you and your colleagues to guide student choices for independent reading, but they should not be a limitation or a requirement. #FPLiteracy
When teachers, specialists, librarians, district leaders, and administrators come together as a team, their collective knowledge about texts can help every child love to read independently, in their classroom, and at home. #FPLiteracy
We would never take a book out of a child’s hands. And when we restrict kids to reading on a specific level, we’re really restricting their opportunities. #FPLiteracy

Read the whole chat below, and save the date for our next Twitter Chat on January 25, 2018 at 8:00pm EST. More...

November 14. 2017

Teacher Tip: Organizing Your Classroom for Independent Reading

Consider the following suggestions as you arrange your classroom for independent reading:

Choose a place in your classroom to create a classroom library. Shelves that accommodate book bins are ideal, with bins organized by genre topic, author, and interest for easy access and browsing by children. Organize the conferring cards in your resource area, so that you can quickly pull the appropriate cards to support your conferences with readers.

From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

November 7. 2017

Why The Literacy Continuum is Critical to Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™


As a teacher using the new Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ System (FPC) you may have been hearing over and over: in order to use the materials as effectively as possible, you need to use The Literacy Continuum to shape the suggested lesson for the learning needs of your particular students. This valuable tool enables you to adjust, extend, and enhance the materials in FPC to the benefit of each student you teach. More...


November 6. 2017

Teacher Tip: How to Engage Parents in Fountas & Pinnell Classroom

There are many opportunities throughout Fountas & Pinnell Classroom to engage parents and caregivers. For example, parents and caregivers can support their children at home by:

  • Listening to the books their children bring home to read
  • Reading books aloud to their children
  • Talking about books together
  • Going to the library
  • Encouraging their children to write for authentic purposes (such as a grocery list, a letter, or directions)
  • Singing songs together
  • Reciting nursery rhymes or poetry together
  • Talking with their children about a variety of topics
  • Encouraging their children to play outside every day
  • Encouraging play in which their children use imagination.

You may also want to invite parents and caregivers into the classroom throughout the year for special literacy occasions, such as:

  • Listening to their children participate in Reader's Theater
  • A reading celebration in which parents and caregivers listen to their children read or they read to their children
  • Watching a puppet show or simple lay the children have written and perform
  • Creating a Literacy Museum where children dress up as a character from a book and share the book with their parent or caregiver.
As you actively and creatively engage parents and caregivers in the literacy lives of their children, each child and family knows that their traditions and cultures are honored and the collaborative partnership between home and school is valued. 

From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.