Blog

March 17. 2017

Fountas & Pinnell Twitter Chat RECAP on Putting Interactive Read-Aloud into Action with Fountas & Pinnell Classroom


On Thursday, March 16, Heinemann hosted a Twitter Chat in which they interviewed authors Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell about the role of Interactive Read-Aloud (IRA) in their newest system, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC). People from all over the country followed along in order to learn more about putting Interactive Read-Aloud into action with this exciting, first-of-its-kind, cohesive system for high-quality classroom-based literacy instruction. Followers learned about everything from the importance of Interactive Read-Aloud within a classroom literacy system to how teachers can engage readers in meaningful discussion through IRA. They also learned about the resources that make up the IRA component in FPC, such as the content that makes up the lessons and the process in which the books were chosen. Some favorite tweets included:

"Reading aloud to students is not a luxury but a necessity."
"All students can think and talk about the text, even if they can't read it it for themselves."
"Reading aloud is an essential foundation of a good language and literature system."

To read the whole chat, click the link below. And mark your calendars to log in on Thursday, April 13, 2017 at 8 p.m. (EST) as we continue the exciting chat series on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™!


March 8. 2017

Teach the Child, Not the Program with RESPONSIVE TEACHING


Fountas and Pinnell believe that responsive teaching is teaching based on the learner and the teacher’s knowledge of the learner rather than simply knowing and using a program. Teacher expertise comes from the close observation of the learners, noticing an area that needs instruction, and being able to teach in the moment. Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC) relies upon teacher expertise to be successful just as much as good teaching needs the support of high-quality materials. Fountas and Pinnell have created this system of materials and resources that allows teachers to operationalize the vision and goals of responsive teaching. Here are some of the ways responsive teaching is supported and honored in Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™.

High-Quality Texts

In order to help students fall in love with reading, give them books they want to read. Students need access to a wide range of topics, themes, genres, and forms as they participate in all instructional contexts, which are all opportunities for observation and responsive teaching. FPC is made up of the very best, age-appropriate trade books, and the most powerful, authentic, original texts. The trade books used in Interactive Read-aloud, Independent Reading, and Book Clubs promote the joy of reading while expanding vocabulary and nurturing the ability to think, talk, and write about texts.  The beautifully crafted original texts in Guided Reading help to build each student’s ability to process increasingly challenging books with fluency and comprehension, while an exquisite collection of original texts (enlarged and small versions) make up Shared Reading, which is a highly supportive context in which you can nurture students' ability to construct meaning.

Observation and Assessment to Inform Teaching Decisions

Fountas and Pinnell describe responsive teaching as "those moment-to-moment decisions that you make as you observe and analyze your students' behaviors. It is the observation and analysis of the students' reading behaviors that informs your next teaching moves," (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). It's up to you to know the readers through observation. Those observations will inform you as to what books to select and what teaching decisions to make. Consider each lesson in FPC a blueprint of instructional options from which teachers select to best support each learner in the classroom.  These materials support your ability to gather student data, analyze it, and use it to set up a successful context within which you can teach successfully. 

Common Teacher Language

“Language weaves a community together, and it is developed through communication and problem solving,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). Responsive teaching requires your continual attention and reflection on your students' observable behaviors and the effects of your teaching decisions on their learning. One important element is the facilitative language you use to respond to the learner. Fountas and Pinnell believe strongly that teacher language is all-important in responsive teaching. Teacher statements, prompts, and questions should be as clear and precise as possible. The tools and materials in FPC are developed in a way that will help you hone your language until it becomes internalized and you don't need to refer to the tools anymore. 

"The responsive teacher observes readers and writers very carefully, weaving a valuable set of understandings about each. Then, in a continuously evolving process, he tailors his precise responses to the readers’ strengths and needs," (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

Keep an eye out for release dates and more information on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ here to learn how you can start supporting RESPONSIVE TEACHING in your classroom.

~The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Team

References:
Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann. 

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 

For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/  

February 24. 2017

Build COHERENCE in Your Classroom with a Multi-text Approach to Literacy Instruction

Fountas and Pinnell  believe that learning deepens when students think, talk, read, and write about authentic texts across many different instructional contexts. They believe that each instructional context should work as a coherent system that improves student outcomes, and creates literacy opportunities for the whole school. In their new system, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom, each context works together in a cohesive manner to support the literacy learning of every student. “All play an essential role; they contribute in different ways to each student’s development as readers, writers, and language users,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

The instructional contexts are: interactive read-aloud, shared reading, guided reading, independent reading, and book clubs/literature discussion. You start with high teacher support in shared reading and interactive read-aloud, and gradually release the control over to the students through guided reading and independent reading, while book clubs and literature discussion are woven throughout. The level of support will vary, however, depending on the demands of the text and the level of control by readers, which can fluctuate at any point in time.

Fountas and Pinnell recommend five instructional contexts for reading that will give students five kinds of reading opportunities using different levels of support. Interactive Read-Aloud (high teacher support)

In interactive read-aloud, you start by selecting a high-quality, short picture book (or occasionally a longer chapter book) so the students are listening to the story or nonfiction book as you read it to them, not decoding words and attending to punctuation. While the students listen, they are engaging systems of strategic actions for comprehending texts.  Interactive read-aloud is usually a  whole-class “interactive” activity intended to spark discussion. So, as you read, you can stop at specific points in the text and encourage your students to turn and talk to a partner or respond to the whole group. “Interactive read-aloud is a way to engage daily in comprehending and articulating their thinking about age-appropriate material (the level is generally beyond the instructional reading level of most of the students),” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

Shared Reading (high to medium teacher support)

In shared reading, you start by selecting an enlarged text because, unlike read-aloud, you want the print and other text features to be visually available to your students. You can choose a wide variety of genres and formats and offer high teacher support as you did in interactive read-aloud. First, you read the text aloud to the students while engaging them in a discussion about it. Then, invite them to read along with you. After the book has been read in unison several times, the students can read it on their own or with a partner. “As readers become more proficient, shared reading continues to offer opportunities for more advanced reading work that students can do independently,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

Guided Reading (medium to low teacher support)

In guided reading, you do not read aloud to the students. This allows them to have more control of the reading process, as opposed to interactive read-aloud and shared reading where they had high teacher support. You choose a high-quality text that is new to them, and in a small-group setting you provide a carefully planned introduction, and they read it individually. After they read, you can guide them in a discussion about the meaning of the text using teaching points based on your observations. Finally, if appropriate, you can engage in work with words and letters.

Independent Reading (low teacher support)

Independent reading is all about choice. Your primary role in independent reading is to provide students with a rich, well-organized collection of books from which to choose. The texts should be in a variety of genres and levels of difficulty so all students will be able to find something they want to read. “Independent reading is placed within a strong instructional frame, through minilessons to help students apply understandings to their own reading and learn how to choose books they can enjoy, reading conferences to support thinking, and group share for further learning and assessment,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).  

Book Clubs/Literature Discussion (high to low teacher support)

In book clubs (literature discussion), students choose their own text, but have a limited selection from which to choose. Students then join a book club group to talk together about the text they chose. Their choices may not match their competencies, so teachers will have to either read the texts to them, or provide them with an audio recording. “The teacher gathers the students for a discussion, at first providing a higher level of support, but gradually with lessening support as students take over the discussion,” (Fountas and Pinnell).

Keep an eye out for release dates and more information on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom here to learn when you can start to build COHERENCE in your classroom.

~The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Team

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 

For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/ 

References:

Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades.© 2017 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

February 17. 2017

Twitter Chat Recap on the NEW Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™

On Thursday, February 16, Heinemann hosted a Twitter Chat in which they interviewed authors Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell about their newest system, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC). People from all over the country followed along in order to learn more about this exciting, first-of-its-kind, cohesive system for high-quality classroom-based literacy instruction. Educators were highly engaged making #FPLiteracy the #1 trending hashtag for the entire hour-long chat, and well into the night. Followers learned about everything from the instructional contexts that make up FPC to what is at the heart of the system. They learned about the many components and high-quality texts that are included while gaining insight into the philosophy that went into its creation.

To read the whole chat, click the link below. And mark your calendars to log in on Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 8 p.m. (EST) as we continue the exciting chat series on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™!



February 10. 2017

What is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom?


There has been a lot of buzz over the last few months about the mysterious Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. What is it? When will it be out? How can I get my hands on it?! Well it's official. The future of literacy education is finally here!

What is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom?

The short version is that Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ is a classroom-based literacy system for grades PreK to 6 designed to change the landscape of reading instruction. But it is so much more. The materials and thoughtfulness that makes up this system, and the energy that has gone into creating it, is anything but short. Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ is designed to lift students' learning beyond the walls of the classroom with high-quality texts and an instructional blueprint for teaching that will create authentic experiences in reading, thinking, talking, writing, and reflecting. Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ will help teachers provide students with the opportunity to see themselves reflected in the books they read and write about; grow as thoughtful users of literacy; and engage in real reading, writing, and thinking. With this system, teachers will work on the cutting edge of students' learning; support independence and students' agency; and understand the critical role of responsive teaching in leading literacy learning forward. This system is meant to help teachers show students the way in which they can live a literate life.

Instructional Contexts and Materials

A student's learning deepens when they think, talk, and write about high-quality, rich, authentic texts across many different instructional contexts. Those instructional contexts are thoroughly represented in Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. Below is a breakdown of each context, and the materials that come with them:


WHOLE-GROUP TEACHING

 • Interactive Read-Aloud: the very best age-appropriate, grade-appropriate trade books to promote the joy of reading, expand vocabulary, and nurture the ability to think, talk, and write about texts that fully engage students' interest. (120 titles per grade PreK to 6; lesson folder per title.)

 • Reading Minilessons: Using an inquiry approach, the reading minilessons provide explicit teaching of the behaviors presented in the Interactive Read-Aloud lessons. (150 minilessons per grade.)

 • Shared Reading: an exquisite collection of original texts (enlarged and accompanying small versions) that nurture students' ability to construct meaning in a supported context so they can enjoy reading and learn critical concepts of how texts work. (200 titles spanning grades PreK-3; lesson folder per title.)

 • Phonics/Spelling/Word Study Lessons: Minilessons driven by principles from the Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide and The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum. (100 minilessons per grade.)

SMALL-GROUP TEACHING

 • Guided Reading: the most powerful and engaging authentic texts to build each student's ability to process increasingly challenging books with fluency and comprehension. Build a rich guided reading collection over time with 5 titles per level A-Z on the F&P Text Level Gradient™; lesson folder per title.

 • Book Clubs/Literature Discussion: an authentic opportunity to bring students together for in-depth discussion of a captivating trade book they have read in order to extend thinking and learn about themselves as readers. (32 titles per grade K-3; 48 titles per grade 4-6; facilitator card per title.)

INDEPENDENT LEARNING

 • Independent Reading: A carefully curated collection of authentic children’s literature that provides the opportunity for students to develop tastes as readers and to read a large number of self-selected books independently. With accompanying contexts cards, you can make specific teaching points in brief conferences that lead the individual reader forward. (150 titles per grade K-2; 200 titles per grade 3-6; conferring card per title.)

Pricing and Release Dates

Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ will be released in stages over the next few years with the first wave coming out in the fall of this year! Pricing and what will be out and when is still being ironed out, but you’re sure to be the first to know by doing the following:

·         Contact your local sales representative. Once all the information becomes available they will be able to walk you through your options. If you don’t know who your sales rep is click here to find out.

·         Sign up on the Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ landing page here to receive the most recent updates on release dates and pricing info.

·         Become a member of the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Community page at www.fountasandpinnell.com to receive exclusive information as it becomes available, including free, LIVE webinars with Fountas and Pinnell! Sign up now for the next webinar about Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ on 2/15 at 4:00 p.m. here.

·         Follow @FountasPinnell on Twitter and join our monthly LIVE Twitter Chats with Fountas and Pinnell with #FPLiteracy. Our next chat will be on 2/16 at 8:00 p.m.

"Whether you are teaching prekindergarteners to recognize individual letters in their names or you are teaching sixth graders to recognize bias in the language of a persuasive text, your work is transformative. It’s demanding, challenging, and at times altogether frustrating. But your work as a teacher of literacy is also worthwhile and important because it transforms the lives of children," (Fountas and Pinnell 2018).

~The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Team

 

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 


For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/ 


February 3. 2017

Ask Meli! February, 2017

Meli received many, many questions from all over the country!! She was so excited and touched to read through all of the wonderfully written letters, and look at the pictures that some of you drew. She was most excited to know that students enjoy reading, and even better that they enjoy reading her books!

Below are questions sent in from Contessa, Amari, Wyatt, and Kendall from Parkside Elementary in Monroe, WI!

Q: I love your books and like your books! How come you are in the books with Sam and Jessie? ~Contessa

: Thank you, Contessa, for loving and liking my books! Sam and Jessie are my friends, but I only visit them a few times a year. They let me in on all of the adventures they have together. We play a lot! Some of their best adventures happen when I'm there, so we make books about them. And I get to be in the books too!

Q: I love your books! What kind of treats do you eat? ~Amari

: Thank you for loving my books, Amari! I love all kinds of treats. Cantaloupe is definite a favorite, but I also like to munch on baby carrots. And, of course, I LOVE doggie cookies!

Q: I love your books! Are you ever going to be in a book with Orson and Taco? ~Wyatt

: I'm so glad you love the Meli books. I love them too! There are no immediate plans to be in a book with Orson and Taco, but you never know! Maybe someday.

Q: I love your books! How many books are you in? ~Kendall

: Including the Sam and Jessie books, I would have to say about a dozen. But keep a lookout for MORE Meli books coming soon in the new system Irene and her friend, Gay, are working on, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom. Tell your teacher to click here to learn more about that.

Meli would love to know what kind of books you like to read! You can let her know in your letters along with anymore questions, so keep them coming! We will have a new post each month. Please be sure to send them to Meli c/o The Fountas & Pinnell Team, 361 Hanover St., Portsmouth, NH 03801. And don't forget to Tweet your questions to @FountasPinnell with #FPAskMeli.

See you soon!

~Meli and The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Team

January 26. 2017

What Is the Difference Between Guided Reading and Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI)?


We have received a lot of questions from teachers recently about how the Fountas & Pinnell Leveled Literacy Intervention Systems differ from guided reading. Here is a rundown of what they are, how they are alike, and how they differ. “We believe that a literate life is the right of every child, and most children need expert teaching to have access to that life,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).


What is Guided Reading?

Guided reading is one component of a comprehensive language and literacy framework for classroom instruction; it is not the only context that contributes to a student’s reading growth. Across many contexts, students receive instruction in reading comprehension, phonics/word study, and writing. The texts should be accessible to each student in the group with the support of skilled teaching, which means that the text should offer some challenges. Each lesson should show students how to “think like readers and expand their in-the-head network of systems of strategic actions,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). 

What is LLI?

LLI is a literacy intervention system for students who find reading and writing difficult. The objective is to bring struggling readers and writers to grade-level competency. LLI is a systematically designed, sequenced, short, supplementary lesson that builds on high-quality classroom instruction. The instruction is highly concentrated in reading, writing, and phonics.  Even with many high-quality literacy opportunities, some students struggle with literacy learning. LLI gets them back on track so they can benefit fully from classroom instruction. Its goal is to give students the boost they need to read at the same level as their peers. 

How are they the same?

Both guided reading and LLI are daily, small-group instruction that helps students develop proficient systems of strategic actions for reading. 

The purpose of both guided reading and LLI is to develop a deep understanding that blossoms into an appreciation of the craft of writing, expansion of thinking, and increased enjoyment, which are goals for every year of school. 

Benchmark Assessment Systems should be used to determine the instructional level for each student in both LLI and guided reading.

How are they different?

Purpose. LLI is meant to supplement classroom instruction, whereas guided reading is differentiated classroom instruction. 

Students. Guided reading is used with all students while LLI is used with readers who are having difficulty and are reading below grade level.

Duration. LLI is a temporary, short-term intervention (10 to 24 weeks depending on which system is being used), while guided reading is ongoing across elementary school years. 

Materials. Leveled books are used for both guided reading and LLI. The texts in LLI, however, are designed specifically for the system and placed in a preplanned sequence, while the leveled texts for guided reading are selected by the teacher for the group.

Grouping. In guided reading, students who are similar in their reading development are placed in small groups of 4 to 8. In LLI, students are also grouped according to similar instructional levels, but in groups of 3, moving up to a maximum of 4 for upper grades.

Time. In guided reading, lessons should take approximately 15 to 25 minutes daily, while LLI lessons are 30 minutes daily, stretching to 45 minutes for upper elementary grades.

Teacher. Guided reading lessons are given by the classroom teacher. LLI lessons can be given by classroom teachers, but are usually done by an interventionist or literacy specialist.  

For more information on LLI and Guided Reading resources, visit www.fountasandpinnell.com.

~The Fountas & Pinnell Team

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 

For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/ 

January 19. 2017

Guided Reading Twitter Chat with Fountas and Pinnell, Part 2 from 1/12/2017

On Thursday, January 12th, authors Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell hosted part two of a Twitter chat on Guided Reading: Responsive Teaching Across the Grades, Second Edition. People from all over the country logged in to discuss important topics such as, how teachers make decisions about what is important to teach for at each guided reading level, and how an effective book introduction can unlock a text for students in a guided reading lesson. Teachers tweeted about how the use of instructional level texts within guided reading challenges and advances the reading power of students, while Fountas and Pinnell offered words of advice and encouragement such as, "A level is not a score; it stands for a set of behaviors that teachers can observe for evidence of, teach for, and reinforce at every level readers."

To read the whole chat, click the link below. And mark your calendars to log in on Thursday, February 16, 2017 at 8 p.m. (EST) as we begin an exciting chat series on Fountas & Pinnell Classroom—our forthcoming classroom-based literacy system. 


January 13. 2017

The Importance of Creating a Community of Learners

Would you describe your school's culture as being warm and supportive, but without attention to rigorous learning? Or is it run like a tight ship in an attempt to create rigorous learning, but lacks warmth? Fountas and Pinnell believe that in order to build an inclusive, respectful, and supportive social community where people collaborate with and help each other, you can't have one scenario without the other. One of the goals of the second edition of Guided Reading is to get teachers to not only treat the classroom as a place to learn to read, write, and expand language skills, but to create a community of learners. Here are some ways to start building your community!

Provide Thought-Provoking Books

The classroom is where students spend most of their lives. It's important to create an environment that helps them think deeply about the world, themselves, and how they fit into the world as global citizens. A great way to open up these channels of thinking is through books! Give them high-quality books that help them think about important ideas and issues, and about developing empathy for others. 

Think About Classroom Management 

In Guided Reading, 2e, Fountas and Pinnell describe the behavioral and emotional expectations of a student from entry to middle school; the traits you want to see in a successful student. These include, social interaction, empathy, sense of community, emotional well-being, and self-regulation. Guided Reading, 2e shows you ways to provide numerous opportunities for students to learn these traits throughout the school day, from grade to grade, starting with the classroom. Your classroom should be a peaceful environment and reflect a climate of acceptance in which you can communicate to your students that you are interested in what they have to say. But you should also think about the physical space, as well as predictability, empathy and kindness, inquiry, and more. “Your classroom is a place where students learn how to read, write, and expand all of their language skills, but it is much more. It is a laboratory where they learn how to be confident, self-determined, kind, and democratic,” (Fountas and Pinnell 2017).

Have a Design for Literacy Education

Creating the ideal literacy classroom environment where your students are always thinking, talking, and reading about the world can be a daunting task. You want to make adequate time for designing a landscape for language and literacy learning, but how? Where do you start? Fountas and Pinnell know from personal experience, and from talking to teachers that there are many constraints—both physical and financial—to creating this ideal environment, but it is possible. In Guided Reading, 2e, Fountas and Pinnell provide creative ways to take this vision of a literacy classroom into an actual design, as well as provide advice on how to create this classroom on a budget.  "When students spend their time thinking, reading, writing, and talking every day, they get a message about what is valued in your classroom and they begin to develop their own values," (Fountas and Pinnell 2017). 

Building a literacy community in your classroom takes a lot of thought and effort, but the payoff is worth it. "In a sense, the classroom is a sheltered environment within a noisy world where everything interferes with high-level intellectual discourse and time for reading and writing. But in these short years students have a chance to live a literate life that expands their empathy, curiosity, and competencies. Literacy is their job," (Fountas and Pinnell, 2017). 

~The Fountas & Pinnell Team

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 

For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/ 

January 6. 2017

Fountas & Pinnell Online Resources: What they are and how to find them


Whether you're a new user of Fountas and Pinnell materials or a current user, you most likely need to access the Fountas & Pinnell Online Resources. We recently updated our website, so things have changed a bit. In case you're having trouble gaining access or finding the Online Resources, here's a little how-to.

What are the Fountas & Pinnell Online Resources?

The Fountas & Pinnell Online Resources is a repository of printable resources, record keeping forms, videos, and more that are referenced in various Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ products. Most of these resources may have been available through a CD-ROM at one point, but in order to meet the technological needs of our customers, it made sense to have them be accessible online. 

Where do I find the link to the Online Resources?

You can quickly find the link to the Online Resources here or you can go to www.fountasandpinnell.com and click on the "Visit other FPL sites" button on the top right-hand corner of the homepage (see image obove). The first item on that page will be the Online Resources. You will need to log in to gain access. If you don't have a login, you will need to register, which is free and easy.

How do I gain access to the Online Resources?

If you are a first-time user, you will need an access code once you are registered. You can find your access codes in different places depending on the product and edition. Some examples are: the inside front cover of your System Guides for LLI, Assessment Guides for BAS, or in the Introduction of Guided Reading. If you have one of the earlier editions of LLI or BAS that comes with the Technology Package and the physical CD-ROMs and DVDs, you will not have received an access code with the purchase of those systems. You can get an access code by contacting Heinemann Tech Support here or by calling 800-225-5800. You must have already purchased a product to acquire an access code to its Online Resources.

Join the fastest growing community in the field of literacy education. Get your free membership and stay up to date on the latest news and resources from Fountas and Pinnell at www.fountasandpinnell.com 

For a well-organized, searchable archive of FAQs and discussions that are monitored by Fountas and Pinnell-trained consultants, go to our Discussion Board at www.fountasandpinnell.com/forum 

For more collaborative conversation, join the Fountas & Pinnell Literacy™ Facebook Learning Group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/FountasPinnell/