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Daily Lit Bit

November 21. 2017

Teacher Tip: Organizing Your Classroom for Shared Reading

As you arrange your classroom for shared reading, be sure to accommodate children so that every child can see the big book or chart. Store texts and tools nearby for easy access.

Texts:

  • large print books
  • projected texts
  • shared/interactive writing texts
  • small copies of large texts

Tools:

  • easel
  • plain pointer
  • Wikki Stix®
  • word cards
  • highlighter tape
  • magnetic letters
  • whiteboard
  • pocket chart
  • word masks of various sizes
  • markers
  • correction tape and sticky notes
  • computer and screen, or document camera, to project an image
From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

November 15. 2017

Daily Lit Bit - 11/15/17

Use powerful language during guided reading that reinforces actions that build an effective processing system.

November 14. 2017

Teacher Tip: Organizing Your Classroom for Independent Reading

Consider the following suggestions as you arrange your classroom for independent reading:

Choose a place in your classroom to create a classroom library. Shelves that accommodate book bins are ideal, with bins organized by genre topic, author, and interest for easy access and browsing by children. Organize the conferring cards in your resource area, so that you can quickly pull the appropriate cards to support your conferences with readers.

From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

November 6. 2017

Teacher Tip: How to Engage Parents in Fountas & Pinnell Classroom

There are many opportunities throughout Fountas & Pinnell Classroom to engage parents and caregivers. For example, parents and caregivers can support their children at home by:

  • Listening to the books their children bring home to read
  • Reading books aloud to their children
  • Talking about books together
  • Going to the library
  • Encouraging their children to write for authentic purposes (such as a grocery list, a letter, or directions)
  • Singing songs together
  • Reciting nursery rhymes or poetry together
  • Talking with their children about a variety of topics
  • Encouraging their children to play outside every day
  • Encouraging play in which their children use imagination.

You may also want to invite parents and caregivers into the classroom throughout the year for special literacy occasions, such as:

  • Listening to their children participate in Reader's Theater
  • A reading celebration in which parents and caregivers listen to their children read or they read to their children
  • Watching a puppet show or simple lay the children have written and perform
  • Creating a Literacy Museum where children dress up as a character from a book and share the book with their parent or caregiver.
As you actively and creatively engage parents and caregivers in the literacy lives of their children, each child and family knows that their traditions and cultures are honored and the collaborative partnership between home and school is valued. 

From Fountas & Pinnell Classroom System Guide by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Copyright (c) 2018 by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. Published by Heinemann.

November 6. 2017

Daily Lit Bit - 11/6/15

Whether you are teaching prekindergarteners to recognize individual letters in their names or you are teaching sixth graders to recognize bias in the language of a persuasive text, your work is transformative. It’s demanding, challenging, and at times altogether frustrating. But your work as a teacher of literacy is also worthwhile and important because it transforms the lives of children.