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Daily Lit Bit

December 6. 2016

Enable students to learn how to learn about genre: A Teacher Tip from Fountas and Pinnell on an inquiry approach to genre study

In exploring genre study, we advocate teaching and learning in which students are engaged in exploration. By engaging deeply and consistently with a variety of high-quality texts, students build an internal foundation of information on which they can base further learning. They learn how to develop genre understandings and can apply their thinking to any genre.

 

Genre study is a foundational inquiry that involves several steps and gives students the tools they need to navigate a variety of texts with deep understanding.

 

Try these six broad steps in genre study:

 

1. Collect a set of high-quality mentor texts that are clear examples of the genre.

2. Immerse students in several clear examples of the genre in various instructional contexts.

3. Study the common characteristics that are always and often evident of the genre.

4. Define the genre using the list of characteristics to create a short working definition.

5. Teach specific mini lessons on the genre characteristics.

6. Read and Revise the lists and definition as needed and expand students’ genre understanding.

 

When students understand genre, they can engage more deeply with texts. To learn more about genre study through inquiry-based learning, please reference Genre Study: Teaching with Fiction and Nonfiction Books

December 5. 2016

Lit Bit - 12/5/2016

In a sense, the classroom is a sheltered environment within a noisy world where everything interferes with high-level intellectual discourse and time for reading and writing. But in these short years students have a chance to live a literate life that expands their empathy, curiosity, and competencies. Literacy is their job.

December 2. 2016

Daily Lit Bit - 12/2/2016

A carefully selected text is a critical element in successful teaching of guided reading.

November 29. 2016

Nurture Young Learners’ Curiosity through Inquiry, A tip from Fountas and Pinnell on Early Literacy Learning

All children need the opportunity for play and inquiry. A rich and joyful early literacy environment in which reading, writing, and talking are part of play, often become play. We must remember that children, especially young children, learn through play. Play enhances language and literacy learning. When your teaching is inquiry-oriented, you enable young children to learn how to learn, investigate and discover new understandings, and pose wonderings about the possibilities.

 

With two kinds of inquiry, information seeking and wondering, children are immersed in constructive learning that results in an exciting, meaningful expansion of knowledge that continues through life. Fountas and Pinnell discuss the inquiry process in depth in their book, Literacy Beginnings.

 

Try these four simple steps of the inquiry process to guide your teaching and propel literacy learning:

1. Playful Exploration (Notice, Wonder)

2. Define Questions (Plan for Observing)

3. Find Out (Investigate, Explore)

4. Share Learning (Discuss, Draw Conclusions)