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FAQ Friday

June 14. 2018

FAQ Friday: How Can LLI Be Integrated into FPC?

Q: How can Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) be integrated into Fountas & Pinnell Classroom (FPC)?

A: LLI supplements FPC for children who need something extra. All children should have high-quality classroom-based literacy instruction, and LLI is the most coherent supplementary literacy intervention to FPC for students that need extra support to achieve grade level proficiency.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

June 7. 2018

FAQ Friday: Is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ aligned to the Common Core?

Q: Is Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ aligned to the Common Core?

A: Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ operationalizes and is fundamentally rooted in the behaviors, understandings, and goals of The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum. The Literacy Continuum is aligned to the Common Core. This document is organized to show the close connection between each of the continua in The Literacy Continuum and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy. 

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May 18. 2018

FAQ Friday: Is There a Scope and Sequence for Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

Q: Is there a scope and sequence for Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

A: Fountas & Pinnell Classroom is not a sequentially sequenced skills-based program, so there is no official scope and sequence. The Literacy Continuum serves as the curriculum underlying Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™. It creates coherence across classrooms and grade levels within your school. You will immediately notice, however, that The Literacy Continuum is not prescriptive. It doesn’t dictate a static scope and sequence of lessons. Rather, The Literacy Continuum is descriptive: it describes, with precision, the characteristics of texts and the observable behaviors and understandings of proficient readers, writers, and language users that you may choose to notice, teach, and support.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

May 11. 2018

FAQ Friday: How Long Does it Take to Administer the Benchmark Assessment to a Student?

Q: How long does it take to administer the Benchmark Assessment to a student?

A: At the earliest levels, a full assessment conference may take 20–30 minutes. At the upper levels, where the texts are longer and the conversations more substantive, it may take 30-40 minutes, but as you gain experience, the time will be shorter. Remember that the longer books have a stopping point for oral reading. Also, fluency makes a difference. In this guide, we make several suggestions for how to make efficient use of your time. Remember that each student has had a chance for one-on-one time reading and talking with the teacher.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

May 4. 2018

FAQ Friday: Unpacking the Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System

Q: How do I organize the materials in the new Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System?

A: View this UNPACKING Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study System document for a step-by-step guide on how to organize the materials that come in the system. 

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

April 26. 2018

FAQ Friday: Do the Shared Reading Books in FPC Have Levels?

Q: Do the Shared Reading books in Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ have levels?

A: No. The Shared Reading books are not leveled. Leveled books are ONLY meant to be used in guided reading instruction and to guide students during independent reading.

In the early years, shared reading provides easy entry into behaving like a reader. It helps students understand how to find and use information from print—directional movement, one-to-one correspondence, words and letters, and the whole act of reading and understanding a story or nonfiction text. As readers become more proficient, shared reading continues to offer opportunities for more advanced reading work than students can do independently. Supported by the group, they can take on more complex texts; and, with your teaching, they can learn a great deal which they can then apply in guided and independent reading.

The guided reading books in FPC were created and leveled according to the text characteristics in the Guided Reading section of The Literacy Continuum. The guided reading section is organized by the F&P Text Level Gradient™, A–Z+. The Shared Reading books were created according to the text characteristics in the Shared Reading section of The Literacy Continuum, which is organized by grade level, not by levels according to the gradient. The characteristics upon which the Shared Reading books were created are different from that of the guided reading characteristics so they cannot be leveled according to the gradient.

The accompanying smaller books should only be used for independent reading, not guided. The children are meant to be encouraged to reread them after the Shared Reading lesson in order to practice. They cannot be used in guided reading because they are not created according to guided reading characteristics, and therefore would not correspond with any level on the F&P Text Level Gradient™.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

April 20. 2018

FAQ Friday: Are There Plans to Add Books to the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System?

Q: Are there plans to add books to the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System?

A: There are no plans to add books to the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment System. We feel that the two books at each level (one fiction, one nonfiction) are all that is needed. If you use a book for an assessment conference at the beginning of the year, the child will likely be reading at a different level by the next conference interval. If for some reason this is not the case, use the alternate book at that level. Furthermore, if a book is too hard for a child, you should discontinue the reading. You can use this book again if the child read very little of it months before.

If you are finding that a student is not progressing, take a look at The Fountas & Pinnell Literacy Continuum for that level to see in what behaviors the student may be lacking. Then, try and focus your teaching around cultivating those behaviors.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

April 13. 2018

FAQ Friday: What are the Major Differences Between Benchmark Assessment System, Second and Third Editions?

Q: What are the major differences between Benchmark Assessment System, Second and Third Editions?

  • New Comprehension Conversation Scoring Rubrics. The new rubrics enable more rigorous and consistent administration, analysis, and scoring. 
  • Revised Comprehension Conversation scoring. We have found that teachers need more guidance on how to conduct the Comprehension Conversation portion of the reading record. To provide this help, we have more clearly defined this process through the creation of a new rubric and have updated the scoring criteria. As a result, there will be more consistency and accuracy in scoring this portion of the assessment. Elimination of the extra point will bring greater consistency of scoring among teachers. 
  • Updates to the Assessment Guides, Recording Forms, Online Data Management System, and the Benchmark Assessment System Reading Record Apps
  • Enhanced digital delivery and elimination of physical CDs and DVDs. All Recording Forms, Summary Forms, optional assessments, and all NEW Professional Development Videos and Tutorial Videos are now available on Online Resources. In an effort to meet the changing technology landscape, we are eliminating the inclusion of any CDs or DVDs in the system. A unique product code, available on the inside front cover of each Third Edition Assessment Guide, will "unlock" the content in Online Resources. 
  • All new student and teacher video examples on the Professional Development Videos. Video examples are updated with all new content, including the new prompts and scoring for the comprehension conversation. 
  • Benchmark Assessment books revised for factual information in nonfiction and other minor changes in fiction and nonfiction.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

April 6. 2018

FAQ Friday: Can Chapter Books Be Used for Guided Reading?

Q: Can chapter books be used for guided reading?

A: You can occasionally use a chapter book in guided reading, but we recommend selecting books that can be read within about a week. Teaching for comprehending is one reason that we recommend the selection of short texts for guided reading. The things students learn reading short texts can be applied to longer texts in independent reading. One of the advantages of using short texts is that students can experience a great variety of texts in a short time – as many as three to five a week! So, if you do occasionally use a chapter book to build stamina, plan to move quickly, having students read several chapters each day to finish in one or two weeks.

<<To see more FAQs or get answers to other questions from a trained consultant, please visit the Discussion Board!>>

March 29. 2018

FAQ Friday: What is the Difference Between Guided Reading and LLI?

Q: What is the difference between guided reading and Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI)?

A: Guided reading is one component of a comprehensive language and literacy framework for classroom instruction; it is not the only context that contributes to a student’s reading growth. Across many contexts, students receive instruction in reading comprehension, phonics/word study, and writing. The texts should be accessible to each student in the group with the support of skilled teaching, which means that the text should offer some challenges. Guided reading specifically helps students develop proficient systems for strategic actions for reading.

LLI is a literacy intervention system for students who find reading and writing difficult. The objective is to bring struggling readers and writers to grade-level competency. LLI is a systematically designed, sequenced, short, supplementary lesson that builds on high-quality classroom instruction. The instruction is highly concentrated in reading, writing, and phonics. Even with many high-quality literacy opportunities, some students struggle with literacy learning. LLI gets them back on track so they can benefit fully from classroom instruction. Its goal is to give students the boost they need to read at the same level as their peers.