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FAQ Friday

February 9. 2018

FAQ Friday: What Is the Purpose of the Getting Started Lessons in LLI?

Q: What is the purpose of the Getting Started lessons in Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI)?

A: The 10 Getting Started books are pairings of lap books and student books used at the beginning of the LLI Orange and Green Systems to provide maximum support for children for whom the world of print is very new. The books are introduced and read using a shared reading approach: reading to, reading with, and then reading by the students. The goal of the Getting Started lessons is to help children become active, engaged learners and to build a foundation of early reading and writing behaviors. 

Since they are reading the books with such a high level of support, children are able to read levels A, B, C, and D. During this time they are exposed to multiple text features and literacy concepts in a small group setting. 

Then, following the Getting Started lessons in LLI Orange, children begin instruction at Level A. After having experienced higher-level books, they will have a great deal of confidence in their own ability as well as a strong foundation to begin to learn and practice strategic actions needed for the reading process.

The Getting Started lessons can be used for a variety of purposes: students who are instructional at level A, B or below, students who need high support in establishing early literacy concepts, English Language learners, students who need to get a strong fast review of early literacy concepts, students who need to establish routines, and older Special Education students who are reading at lower levels.

February 2. 2018

FAQ Friday - 2/2/18

Q: Is the Fountas & Pinnell Benchmark Assessment standardized assessment?

A: Yes. The administration, coding, scoring, and interpretation are completed using standardized procedures to ensure reliable results. We expect that once you get the standardized results, you will review each child’s data to make good judgments for instruction. Good teacher decisions based on data are essential.

January 26. 2018

FAQ Friday - 1/26/18

Q: What if my Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) group reaches the end of a level and I am not sure they are ready to move to the next level?

A: Look carefully at the recent reading records. Then look at the first lesson for the next higher level. If you think they need more time, “borrow” from the same level in one of the other LLI systems. If you don’t have the other systems, then find more books on the same level and create your own lessons using the same lesson framework. Review the phonics and word work from the level you are just finishing. Be sure you are teaching hard for areas that are holding them back. When children are ready to move up in the text level, recent reading records should show (1) high accuracy rates, (2) evidence of fluent reading (after level C), and (3) good comprehension.

January 19. 2018

FAQ Friday: How Long is Leveled Literacy Intervention?

Q: How Long is Leveled Literacy Intervention?

A: Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) is a short-term program designed to bring children up to grade-level performance:

Instructional Features of the LLI Systems

LLI Primary systems: 12–18 weeks of explicit, direct instruction 30-minutes a day, 5 days a week. Recommended teacher-to-student ratio of 1:3. Systematic intensive work in phonemic awareness, letters, and phonics. 

LLI Intermediate systems: 18–24 weeks of explicit, direct instruction 45-minutes a day, 5 days a week. Recommended teacher-to-student ratio of 1:4. 36 Novel Study lesson for sustained reading of longer texts. 24 Optional Test Prep lessons. 

LLI Middle/High School systems: 18–24+ weeks of explicit, direct instruction 45-minutes a day, 5 days a week. Recommended teacher-to-student ratio of 1:4. 36 Novel Study lesson for sustained reading of longer texts. 24 Optional Test Prep lessons.

January 12. 2018

FAQ Friday: How Often Should the Benchmark Assessment Be Administered?

Q: How often should the Benchmark Assessment be administered?

A: We suggest that you administer the assessment at the beginning of the year to help you determine where to start your teaching with each child. You may also want to conduct the assessment in the middle of the year, to take stock of progress, though you may already have the information from your ongoing use of reading records in instruction. Finally, near the end of the year you may want to conduct one more assessment to obtain a final record of the child's growth across the year. You may decide to administer the last assessment a couple of months before the end of the year. In this case, the assessment can provide information for instruction during the last months of school, while avoiding the redundancy of testing at the very end of one year and the beginning of the next.
January 5. 2018

FAQ Friday: Is Professional Development Available for FPC?

Q: Is professional development available for Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC)?

A: There are several professional development options for FPC.

Included with your FPC Purchase:

Optional Fee-Based:

  • On-Site: One-day, on-site seminars for each instructional context and an FPC Overview seminar
  • Off-Site: Multi-day FPC Institute designed and delivered by Fountas and Pinell for extensive learning. May 21-24, 2018, Dallas, TX.
  • Online: Interact digitally with Fountas & Pinnell-trained consultants. Multiple interactive webinars for each instructional context and an FPC Overview webinar
  • Custom: 10-day custom PD plan for schools/districts that have purchased the whole FPC System.

For additional information and pricing, please visit: http://www.fountasandpinnell.com/professionaldevelopment/ or call 800-225-5800 x1100.
December 22. 2017

FAQ Friday: Can a Child Look at the Book During the Comprehension Conversation?

Q: Can a child look at the book during the comprehension conversation?

A: Yes. One purpose of the Benchmark Assessment System is to give you information to guide your instruction. If a child has to look back as a reminder it doesn’t necessarily mean the child doesn’t understand or remember. Perhaps the child doesn’t feel confident in his or her memory or talking about the text without that confirming look. Reinforcement and prompts to talk about texts without always looking back may build the child's confidence. The teacher needs to know the student and note such observations of behaviors that provide evidence of thinking and analyze the child’s thinking at that point in time.

December 8. 2017

FAQ Friday: How are phonics and word study integrated into Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™?

A: Phonics, spelling, and word study are woven into the various instructional contexts within Fountas & Pinnell Classroom™ (FPC) including:

Phonics, Spelling and Word Study System: The lessons in this system are systematic, and sequenced with built-in flexibility for teachers to choose which minilessons to use and when, according to the needs of the students. Each “Teach” activity within the minilessons is designed for use with the whole class, and the “Apply” activity could be used with a small group, pair, or an individual student. All of the revised lessons are derived and connected to principles from The Fountas & Pinnell Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide, which reflects the specific behaviors related to the nine areas of learning for letters, sounds, and words that children develop over time:

  1. Early Literacy Concepts
  2. Phonological Awareness
  3. Letter Knowledge
  4. Letter-Sound Relationships
  5. Spelling Patterns
  6. High-Frequency Words
  7. Word Meaning/Vocabulary
  8. Word Structure
  9. Word-Solving Actions

FPC Shared Reading Collection: The lessons in the FPC Shared Reading Collection include suggested Phonological Awareness/Phonics/Word Study goals taken from The Literacy Continuum that the text used in the lesson will support the teacher in helping students achieve.

FPC Guided Reading Collection: The goals embedded within the FPC Guided Reading Collection lessons apply the principles from The Fountas & Pinnell Comprehensive Phonics, Spelling and Word Study Guide. In addition, an important component of each FPC Guided Reading Collection lesson are brief, but focused attention to words and how they work in the form of an embedded phonics activity that is based on the Planning for Letter and Word Work After Guided Reading feature from the Guided Reading continuum in The Literacy Continuum.

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